Ways to Engage Students in Novel Ways

Simple team-building exercises to big, open-ended issues that could take a semester to solve are all examples of how to foster creativity. Students will be encouraged to work creatively through an issue to a solution if the lecturer uses novel and difficult questions. These creative strategies must be used in a supportive classroom setting with sufficient time set up for students to find and develop innovative solutions to problems. Here are 14 unique techniques to get kids to participate in discussions, problem-solving, critical thinking, and other activities:

Getting Rid of Assumptions

When one is stuck in current thinking paradigms or has run out of ideas, assumption breaking is highly beneficial. Everyone makes assumptions about how the world works, which might impede us from seeing or developing possibilities in creative settings. Creative thinking is stimulated by deliberately searching out and confronting previously unchallenged ideas.

How: Make a list of assumptions related to a task or problem, such as that a solution is unattainable owing to time and financial limits, that something works due to particular laws or conditions, and that people believe, need, or think about certain things. Then inquire as to why these assumptions are false, and continue the inspection process as old assumptions are challenged and new ones are developed.

Brain-sketching

Students create sketches to answer a specific problem, which they then pass on to their peers as they evolve.

Students are seated in groups of six to eight around a table or in a circle. Each pupil should be given the opportunity to clarify and comprehend any questions or problems. Each participant creates one or more sketches in privacy and passes them to the person to their right when they are finished or after a certain amount of time has passed. Participants can either develop or annotate the sketches that are sent to them, or they can use them to generate new sketches that are shared back and forth.

Brainstorming

Brainstorming is a lateral thinking technique in which students are urged to produce ideas or thoughts that may appear bizarre or frightening at first. It is a valuable tool for developing creative solutions to problems. The participants can then alter and improve them to create new and useful concepts. Brainstorming can aid in the identification of a problem, the diagnosis of a problem, and the identification of potential solutions as well as resistance to proposed solutions.

How: Identify the issue. Clearly state any requirements that must be met. Keep the discussion focused on the topic, but make sure no one critiques or assesses ideas, even if they are blatantly unrealistic, throughout the discussion. In the early phases of a brainstorming session, criticism dampens creativity. The goal is to generate possibilities, thus ideas should be stated rather than developed deeply on the spot. As a result, participants should be encouraged to pick up on existing ideas and develop new ones. After the discussion, one person should be designated as the note-taker, and ideas should be analysed and appraised.

Mapping Concepts

Concept maps are visual representations of knowledge. Nodes, which represent concepts, and connections, which represent relationships between concepts, make up networks. Concept maps can help you come up with new ideas, build complex structures, and communicate complicated concepts. Concept maps can assist teachers measure students’ understanding because they make the integration of old and new knowledge explicit.

Create a focus question that identifies the problem or issue that the map should address. List the major concepts that apply to the area of expertise (approximately 20-25). Place the broadest, most comprehensive notions at the front of the list, and the most detailed concepts towards the bottom. Using post-its on a wall or whiteboard, huge sheets of paper, and other materials, create a hierarchical order of the concepts. Because revision is such an important feature of idea mapping, participants must be able to shift concepts around and recreate the map. Look for cross-connections between concepts and add linking words to the lines between them.

Exaggeration

The SCAMPER heuristic comprises two forms of exaggeration: magnify (or “stretch”) and minimise (or “compact”). This strategy aids in the development of solution ideas. It’s helpful to visualise a problem by putting unstated assumptions about its scale to the test. It allows you to consider what might be suitable if the situation were on a different scale.

How: After establishing a problem to be solved or an idea to develop, make a list of all the pieces of the concept or, if it’s a problem, the problem’s objectives and restrictions. Select one component and brainstorm methods to exaggerate it on a different sheet.

Fishbone

A visual organiser is used in the fishbone technique to discover possible sources of an issue. This method discourages incomplete or premature answers while demonstrating the relative importance of, and relationships between, many aspects of an issue.

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